Chinese Journal of Rehabilitation Theory and Practice ›› 2022, Vol. 28 ›› Issue (12): 1452-1458.doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1006-9771.2022.12.010

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Turn-taking behavior in operational games for autistic children with low language function

YUAN Kexin1,2,FEI Zhixing3,CHEN Siqi1,ZHANG Xueru1,LI Ping4,LIU Qiaoyun1()   

  1. 1. Department of Rehabilitation Science, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062, China
    2. Shanghai Xuhui District Donglifengmeikangjian School, Shanghai 200233, China
    3. Department of Education, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, Britain
    4. Shanghai Putuo District Qixing School, Shanghai 200061, China
  • Received:2022-11-10 Revised:2022-11-11 Online:2022-12-25 Published:2023-01-10
  • Contact: LIU Qiaoyun E-mail:qyliu@spe.ecnu.edu.cn
  • Supported by:
    Shanghai Pujiang Talent Plan Project(2019PJC033);Shanghai Changning District Health Committee Project (No.2019CNECNUPI05-1)(2019CNECNUPI05-1)

Abstract:

Objective To analyze the typical performance of initiating and responding behaviors of turn-taking in operational games for autistic children with low language function in special education schools and to provide a reference for intervention of turn-taking behaviors in operational games.

Methods From November, 2021 to January, 2022, a total of 23 autistic children with low language function (language ability ≤ three years old) in Shanghai Putuo District Qixing School were selected. Their linguistic ability was evaluated. A behavioral assessment approach was used to evaluate the behavior of initiating and responding behaviors of turn-taking in three operational games. The typical errors in initiating behaviors were summarized as difficult to initiate, untimely initiation, no response and abnormal initiation. The typical errors in responding behaviors of turn-taking in operational games were summarized as difficult to respond, untimely response, no response and abnormal response.

Results There was no significant differences in the performance of initiating behaviors among three types of operational games (χ2 = 11.106, P = 0.196), and there were significant differences in the performance of responding behaviors among operational games (χ2 = 26.256, P = 0.001). The initiating behaviors were postively correlated with word comprehension (r = 0.420, P < 0.05), word naming (r = 0.510, P < 0.05), and sentence imitation (r= 0.505, P < 0.05). The responding behaviors were postively correlated with word comprehension (r = 0.546, P < 0.01), word naming (r= 0.728, P < 0.01), sentence comprehension (r = 0.668, P < 0.01) and sentence imitation (r = 0.656, P < 0.01).

Conclusion Autistic children with low language function showed different typical behaviors of initiating and responding behaviors of turn-taking in operational games. It is suggested that when designing training programs for turn-taking skills, targeted interventions should be made to address the typical types of errors in response and initiation turns, and individualized intervention programs should be designed to enhance children's communicative efficacy in play game and promote their language development and social participation.

Key words: autism, low language function, operational games, turn-taking behavior

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